The Kid

By Jon Turteltaub

If you had a chance to meet yourself as an 8-year-old child, would that kid be happy with who you turned out to be? In Russ Duritz’s case, the answer is a resounding “no!” In Walt Disney Pictures’ live-action comedy, “Disney’s The Kid,” Bruce Willis stars as Russ Duritz, a successful image consultant whose life is suddenly turned upsdie down when he magically meets Rusty, Russ himself as an 8-year-old kid. Rusty is a sweet, but slightly geeky, awkard little kid who painfully reminds Russ of everything he hated about himself when he was a child – a pudgy, little cry-baby who was the daily victim of the school bullies – an image Russ has worked hard to overcome and consciously forget. Ironically, the kid is also unhappy with who his 40-year-old self has turned out to be. He is not at all impressed by his attractive physique, wealth or seemingly important accomplishments. He can’t undertand the concept of Russ’ job as an image consultant, or why he has forgotten about their dreams of becoming a pilot. All he knows is that he grows up to be a 40-year-old loser – an adult without a wife or even a dog!

The Big Chill

By Lawrence Kasdan

Nominated for three Academy Awards®, this compassionate story explores the growing pains of seven college housemates from the 1960s who have drifted apart and must now reunite for the funeral of a friend. Having entered adulthood as non-conformists, most now belong to the establishment. Harold (Kevin Kline) has “grown-up” to be a running-shoe magnate; Michael (Jeff Goldblum), a gossip magazine journalist; Sam (Tom Berenger), TV’s hottest private eye; and Nick (William Hurt), a drug dealer. Among the women, Sarah (Glenn Close) is a doctor; Meg (Mary Kay Place), a lawyer; and Karen (Jobeth Williams), a wife and mother in the suburbs. Stunned by the death of their peer and sensing their own mortality, each reevaluates his or her own life and tries to reestablish their bond with their old friends.

Hardball

By Brian Robbins

Keanu Reeves, Diane Lane and D.B. Sweeney score in this uplifting story of triumph over adversity that “hits an emotional home run.” Conor O’Neill (Reeves) is a down-on-his-luck gambler in debt to dangerous loan sharks. Desperate for cash, Conor reluctantly takes a job coaching a youth baseball team. The “team” turns out to be a ragtag group of tough-talking kids from Chicago’s inner city. Secretly, Conor plans to desert the team after he wins a big bet. But the stakes are higher than Conor imagined: The kids need someone to believe in. As Conor wrestles with his past, the kids start to teach him some lessons that will forever change his future-that responsibility and trust must be earned and hope can appear in the most unlikely places.

Katt Williams: Kattpacalypse

By Marcus Raboy

Katt Williams ushers in Kattpacalypse, with an explosive New Year’s Eve performance filmed live in front of 7,000 screaming fans at Los Angeles’ Nokia Theatre. Riffing on everything from Doomsday to Obama, Katt takes the stage with the swagger of a championship boxer, firing off verbal jabs that delivers the funny again and again in a non-stop comedic onslaught.

Synecdoche, New York

By Charlie Kaufman

From Charlie Kaufman, comes a visual and philosophic adventure, “Synecdoche, New York.” As he did with his groundbreaking scripts for “Being John Malkovich”, “Adaptation”, and “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind”, Kaufman twists and subverts form and language as he delves into the mind of a man who, obsessed with his own mortality, sets out to construct a massive artistic enterprise that could give some meaning to his life. Theater director Caden Cotard (Philip Seymour Hoffman) is mounting a new play. His life catering to suburban blue-hairs at the local regional theater in Schenectady, New York is looking bleak. His wife Adele (Catherine Keener) has left him to pursue her painting in Berlin, taking their young daughter Olive with her. His therapist, Madeleine Gravis (Hope Davis), is better at plugging her best-seller than she is at counseling him. A new relationship with the alluringly candid Hazel (Samantha Morton) has prematurely run aground. And a mysterious condition is systematically shutting down each of his autonomic functions, one by one. Worried about the transience of his life, he leaves his home behind. He gathers an ensemble cast into a warehouse in New York City, hoping to create a work of brutal honesty. He directs them in a celebration of the mundane, instructing each to live out their constructed lives in a growing mock-up of the city outside. The years rapidly fold into each other, and Caden buries himself deeper into his masterpiece, but the textured tangle of real and theatrical relationships blurs the line between the world of the play and that of Caden’s own deteriorating reality.

Black Sheep (1996)

By Penelope Spheeris

Meet Mike Donnelly (Chris Farley). He’s one lovable, hilarious accident waiting to happen. Dedicated to helping his big brother Al (Tim Matheson) win the race for Washington State governor, he turns every opportunity for votes into an embarrassing disaster. Campaign aide and super slacker Steve Dodds (David Spade) volunteers to baby-sit Mike. Big mistake! When Mike discovers that the incumbent governor is a crook, he dives headfirst into a whole new level of well-intended destruction. Chris Farley and David Spade, the stars of Tommy Boy, once again show why they are “the comedy team of the ’90s!” (Leo Quinones, KIIS-FM). Directed by Penelope Spheeris (Wayne’s World) and costarring Gary Busey, Black Sheep is “a crowd-pleaser directed with maximum energy!” (Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times). Featuring an electrifying performance by super Seattle band Mudhoney!

Shine a Light

By Martin Scorsese

Academy Award-winning filmmaker Martin Scorsese and the world’s greatest rock n’ roll band, The Rolling Stones, unite to bring audiences the year’s most extraordinary film event, “Shine a Light.” With special appearances by Christina Aguilera, Jack White and Buddy Guy, and four Rolling Stones performances not seen in theaters, Shine a Light is a must-own for rock n’ roll fans across generations.

Lucky Them

By Megan Griffiths

More interested in partying and flirting with young musicians than work, veteran rock journalist Ellie Klug (Toni Collette) has one last chance to prove her value to her magazine’s editor: a no-stone-unturned search to discover what really happened to long lost rock god Matthew Smith, who also happens to be her ex-boyfriend. Teaming up with an eccentric amateur documentary filmmaker (Thomas Haden Church in a delightful performance), Ellie hits the road in search of answers.

The Resurrection of Jake the Snake

By Steve Yu

Jake “the Snake” Roberts was among the most famous professional wrestlers in the world. Millions of fans were compelled by his intense and believable persona, and fans were always transfixed by the gigantic snakes he threw atop his opponents within the “squared circle”. His wit and skill on the microphone captured the attention of audiences around the world. His talent in the professional wrestling industry was undeniable. 30 years later, Roberts has lost nearly everything to his inner demons. His struggle with drugs and alcohol was highly publicized in tabloids and films. The millions of dollars he earned wrestling are gone. After two failed marriages, his 8 kids hardly know him. Barely able to afford rent of his small home, Jake waited for a lonely death. Along with everyone else, he had given up on his life. Unexpectedly, Jake gets a visit from an old friend, “Diamond” Dallas Page. 20 years earlier, Dallas Page was a nobody in wrestling when Roberts took him under his wing and taught him the “art” of professional wrestling. At the age of 35, everyone told page he was too old, yet Roberts helped him become one of the biggest names in the business. Jake believed in him when very few did. Owing much of his successful career to Robert’s teachings, Page returns to Jake’s life in an effort to repay him. “The Resurrection of Jake “The Snake” Roberts” follows the true account of what transpires next, as the two wrestlers who share a one-of-kind bond, struggle against Robert’s past demons and attempt to create a reason to live again. A story that transcends the fictional world of Professional Wrestling to reveal Roberts’ truly inspiring journey to love and respect himself.

Jodorowsky’s Dune

By Frank Pavich

The tale of Jodorowsky and his Dune is a fascinating trip through creativity and imagination, a story about the relentless pursuit of a dream, and the necessity of art. In pre-production for over two years, the film was to star Jodorowsky’s own 12-year-old son Brontis alongside Orson Welles, Mick Jagger, David Carradine and even Salvador Dali, set to a musical score by Pink Floyd and art-design by some of the most provocative talents of the era, including H.R. Giger and Jean ‘Moebius’ Giraud.