Mickey’s Christmas Carol

By Burny Mattinson

Make the season merry with Mickey, Donald, Goofy and all their pals. An all-time Christmas classic gets a fun Disney twist as greedy Scrooge learns to embrace the spirit of the season. Ebenezer Scrooge is far too greedy to understand that Christmas is a time for kindness and generosity, but with the guidance of some new found friends, Scrooge learns to embrace the spirit of the season. Enjoy this timeless tale along with five more holiday-themed shorts.

Citizen Kane

By Orson Welles

1940. Alone at his fantastic estate known as Xanadu, 70-year-old Charles Foster Kane dies, uttering only the single word Rosebud. So ends the odyssey of a life … and begins a fabulous tale of the rise to wealth and power–and ultimate fall–of a complex man: A boy abandoned by his parents inherits a fortune, builds a global newspaper empire and aspires to become President of the United States, but he loses everything over an affair with an untalented nightclub singer. This fascinating story unfolds through the eyes of the people important to the tycoon—each showing a different aspect of Citizen Kane. Frequently regarded as the best American film ever made; winner of an Academy Award® for Best Writing, Original Screenplay; and nominated for an additional eight Academy Awards including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor.

The Shining

By Stanley Kubrick

All work and no play makes Academy Award-winner Jack Nicholson (“As Good As It Gets,” “Batman”), the caretaker of an isolated resort, go way off the deep end, terrorizing his young son and wife Shelley Duvall (“Roxanne”). Master filmmaker Stanley Kubrick’s (“Full Metal Jacket,” “2001: A Space Odyssey”) visually haunting chiller, based on the bestseller by master-of-suspense Stephen King (“The Stand,” “Carrie,” “The Shawshank Redemption”), is an undeniable contemporary classic. Newsweek Magazine calls this “the first epic horror film,” full of indelible images, and a signature role for Nicholson whose character was recently selected by AFI for its’ 50 Greatest Villains.

Fair Game (2010)

By Doug Liman

From the director of The Bourne Identity comes this riveting thriller inspired by the experiences of real-life CIA officer Valerie Plame (Academy Award® nominee** Naomi Watts). When Plame’s retired ambassador husband Joe Wilson (Academy Award® winner** Sean Penn) writes a newspaper article challenging the basis for the U.S. war on Iraq, the White House leaks Plame’s undercover status—leaving her international contacts vulnerable, her career in shambles and her life in danger. Crackling with sharp dialogue, gripping intrigue and heart-pounding suspense, Fair Game is the adventure that’s so unbelievable, it can only be real.

Million Dollar Arm

By Craig Gillespie

Based on a true story, sports agent JB Bernstein (Jon Hamm) finds that business has changed and things aren’t going well for his career. In a last ditch effort to save his livelihood he concocts a scheme to find baseball’s next great pitching ace. Hoping to find a young cricket pitcher he can turn into a major league baseball star, JB travels to India to produce a reality show competition called “The Million Dollar Arm.” With the help of cantankerous but eagle-eyed retired baseball scout Ray Poitevint (Alan Arkin), he discovers Dinesh (Madhur Mittal) and Rinku (Suraj Sharma), two 18 year old boys who have no idea about playing baseball, yet have a knack for throwing a fastball. Hoping to sign them to major league contracts and make a quick buck, JB brings the boys home to America to train. While the Americans are definitely out of their element in India — the boys, who have never left their rural villages — are equally challenged when they come to the States. As the boys learn the finer points of baseball — JB, with the help of his charming friend Brenda (Lake Bell) — learns valuable life lessons about teamwork, commitment and what it means to be a family.

Going In Style (2017)

By Zach Braff

Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan Arkin team up as lifelong buddies Willie, Joe and Al, who decide to buck retirement and step off the straight-and-narrow for the first time in their lives when their pension fund becomes a corporate casualty. Desperate to pay the bills and come through for their loved ones, the three risk it all by embarking on a daring bid to knock off the very bank that absconded with their money.

Foxcatcher

By Bennett Miller

Foxcatcher tells the story of Olympic Gold Medal-winning wrestler Mark Schultz (Tatum), who sees a way out from the shadow of his more celebrated wrestling brother Dave (Ruffalo) and a life of poverty when he is summoned by eccentric multi-millionaire John du Pont (Carell) to move onto his estate and train for the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Desperate to gain the respect of his disapproving mother, du Pont begins “coaching” a world-class athletic team and, in the process, lures Mark into dangerous habits, breaks his confidence and drives him into a self-destructive spiral.

While We’re Young

By Noah Baumbach

Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts are Josh and Cornelia Srebnick, happily married middle-aged members of New York’s creative class. They tried to start a family and were unable to — and have decided they’re okay with that. But as Josh labors over the umpteenth edit of his cerebral new film, it’s plain that he has hit a dry patch and that something is still missing. Enter Jamie (Adam Driver) and Darby (Amanda Seyfried), a free-spirited young couple, who are spontaneous and untethered, ready to drop everything in pursuit of their next passion — retro board games one day, acquiring a pet chicken the next. For Josh, it’s as if a door has opened back to his youth — or a youth he wishes he once had. It’s not long before the restless forty-somethings, Josh and Cornelia, throw aside friends their own age — including Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz in a sly supporting role — to trail after these young hipsters who seem so plugged in, so uninhibited, so Brooklyn cool. “Before we met,” Josh admits to Jamie, “the only two feelings I had left were wistful and disdainful.” But is this new inspiration enough to sustain collaboration and friendship with a couple twenty years their junior? While We’re Young is an openly funny cross-generational comedy of manners about aging, ambition and success, as well as a moving portrait of a marriage tested by the invading forces of youth. No film has better captured the weird, upended logic of urban sophisticates: the older ones embracing their iPads and Netflix, the young ones craving vinyl records and vintage VHS tapes. Powered by Stiller and Driver’s note-perfect lead performances and loose, comic turns by Watts and Seyfried, While We’re Young is a complete pleasure to watch.

Meet the Robinsons

By Stephen John Anderson

Have the “time” of your life with Disney’s fun-filled comedy Meet the Robinsons, a thrilling adventure that takes you to a whole new world full of imagination and surprises. It’s “a masterpiece,” raves John Anderson of “Newsday.” Join a brilliant young inventor named Lewis as he sets off on a time-traveling journey to find the family he never knew. In the fantastical world of 2037, hip-hoppin’ frogs and dogs that wear glasses are as common as talking dinosaurs. In an amazing twist, Lewis discovers that the fate of the future rests in his hands, but he can’t save it alone — he’ll need every bit of help he can get from the wonderfully wacky Robinson family, who help him learn to keep moving forward and never stop believing in himself. Blast off with Meet the Robinsons — It’s an exciting trip your whole family will enjoy!