New York City Skyscrapers (Postcard History)

$21.99 - $20.38

(as of Feb 23,2019 05:56:03 UTC – Details)



New York City Skyscrapers celebrates the numerous awe-inspiring buildings that have made New York the skyscraper capital of the world. This book traces the history of New York’s tallest structures from the late 19th century, when church spires ruled the skyline, through the 20th century, when a succession of amazing buildings soared to new heights. From the Flatiron and Woolworth Buildings to the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings, the skyscrapers of New York have long captured the imagination of people around the world.



The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell

$17.00 - $14.17

(as of Feb 09,2019 18:58:05 UTC – Details)



“Part treatise, part miscellany, unfailingly entertaining.”
–The New York Times

“A small pearl of a book . . . a great tale of the growth of a modern city as seen through the rise and fall of the lowly oyster.”
–Rocky Mountain News

Award-winning author Mark Kurlansky tells the remarkable story of New York by following the trajectory of one of its most fascinating inhabitants–the oyster.
For centuries New York was famous for this particular shellfish, which until the early 1900s played such a dominant a role in the city’s life that the abundant bivalves were Gotham’s most celebrated export, a staple food for all classes, and a natural filtration system for the city’s congested waterways.

Filled with cultural, historical, and culinary insight–along with historic recipes, maps, drawings, and photos–this dynamic narrative sweeps readers from the seventeenth-century founding of New York to the death of its oyster beds and the rise of America’s environmentalist movement, from the oyster cellars of the rough-and-tumble Five Points slums to Manhattan’s Gilded Age dining chambers. With The Big Oyster, Mark Kurlansky serves up history at its most engrossing, entertaining, and delicious.

“Suffused with [Kurlansky’s] pleasure in exploring the city across ground that hasn’t already been covered with other writers’ footprints.”
Los Angeles Times Book Review

“Fascinating stuff . . . [Kurlansky] has a keen eye for odd facts and natural detail.”
The Wall Street Journal

“Kurlansky packs his breezy book with terrific anecdotes.”
Entertainment Weekly

“Magnificent . . . a towering accomplishment.”
Associated Press
Random House Trade



Only in New York: 400 Remarkable Answers to Intriguing, Provocative Questions About New York City

$21.99

(as of Jan 23,2019 19:24:36 UTC – Details)


400 Questions and Answers to the Big Apple’s oddest mysteries: from the pages of the New York Times

New York has long held a place as the nation’s most admired and reviled city, provoking more debate, affection, and curiosity than any other. Generations of visitors and residents alike have pondered the city’s enduring quirks and unusual traditions. In the F.Y.I. column in The New York Times, the paper’s reporters and editors turn their talents to answering readers’ most perplexing queries about the city, some of which include:

* City with a Past: Where was the World Trade Center originally going to be located? Where was the last opium den in New York?
* Underground, Underfoot: Is there a secret tunnel linking Police Headquarters to a nearby tavern? What was the busiest day in subway history?
* The Name Game: Is there really a Main Street in Manhattan? What was the Street of Brides?
* And lots more!

Amply illustrated with Stuart Goldenberg’s whimsical cartoons, and with an introduction from Constance Rosenblum, editor of the Times‘s City section, Only in New York is sure to generate laughter, delight, and “Aha!” reactions in anyone who has ever been stumped by one of Gotham’s countless oddities.



Punk Avenue: Inside the New York City Underground, 1972-1982

$15.95 - $13.27

(as of Jan 11,2019 17:35:05 UTC – Details)


Finalist, 2017 Indie Book Awards for Autobiography/Memoir, Foreword Reviews

Punk Avenue: The New York City Underground 1972-1982 is an intimate look at author Paris-born Phil Marcade’s first ten years in the United States where drifted from Boston to the West Coast and back, before winding up in New York City and becoming immersed in the early punk rock scene. From backrooms of Max’s and CBGB’s to the Tropicana Hotel in Los Angeles and back, Punk Avenue is a tour de force of stories from someone at the heart of the era. With brilliant, often hilarious prose, Marcade relays first-hand tales about spending a Provincetown summer with photographer Nan Goldin and actor-writer Cookie Mueller, having the Ramones play their very first gig at his party, working with Blondie’s Debbie Harry on French lyrics for her songs, enjoying Thanksgiving with Johnny Thunders’ mother, and starting the beloved NYC punk-blues band The Senders. Along the way, he smokes a joint with Bob Marley, falls down a mountain, gets attacked by Nancy Spungen’s junkie cat, become a junkie himself, adopts a dog who eats his pot, opens for The Clash at Bond’s Casino, opens a store named Rebop on Seventh Avenue, throws up in some girl’s mouth, talks about vacuum cleaners with Sid Vicious, lives thru the Blackout of 1977, gets glue in his eye, gets mugged at knife point, plays drums with Johnny Thunders’ band Gang War, sets some guy’s attache-case on fire, listens to pre-famous Madonna singing in the rehearsal studio next to his, gets mugged at gun point, O.D.s on heroin, gets saved by a gentle giant named Bill, lives at night… Never sleeps…  A very funny book.

THREE ROOMS



New York City Subway Trains: 12 Classic Punch and Build Trains

$19.99

(as of Jan 04,2019 05:09:25 UTC – Details)


The New York City Subway system celebrates its 100th anniversary on October 27, 2004, but you can bring the romance of the old subway alive today with the Subway Punch-out Book. The book includes 15 easy-to-assemble punch-out train cars that are modeled after the historic old trains from the New York Transit Museum archives. The cars are printed on full-color laminated paper, with identifying historical information printed on the bottom of each. It’s a fun book that sneaks in some fascinating history of America’s first subway system, and it’s the perfect gift for any New Yorker or New York-a-phile you might know! < /p>

Ride the subway down memory lane with pictures of cars such as:< /p>

o The classic R32/R38, also known as the Brightliners< /p>

o The traditional New York Subway Car that ran on every part of the IRT subway and was known for its speed and reliability< /p>

o The famous BMT D-Type, the best-loved and most fun to ride BMT car with its distinctive appearance inside and out < /p>

The New York Transit Museum is home to more than 100 years of transit lore and memorabilia. The museum’s central facility is housed in an authentic 1930s subway station in Brooklyn Heights.< /p>Used Book in Good Condition



The Routes Not Taken: A Trip Through New York City’s Unbuilt Subway System

$19.95 - $17.45

(as of Dec 19,2018 13:52:56 UTC – Details)


Robert A. Van Wyck, mayor of the greater city of New York, broke ground for the first subway line by City Hall on March 24, 1900. It took four years, six months, and twenty-three days to build the line from City Hall to West 145th Street in Harlem. Things rarely went that quickly ever again. The Routes Not Taken explores the often dramatic stories behind the unbuilt or unfinished subway lines, shedding light on a significant part of New York City’s history that has been almost completely ignored until now.

Home to one of the world’s largest subway systems, New York City made constant efforts to expand its underground labyrinth, efforts that were often met with unexpected obstacles: financial shortfalls, clashing agendas of mayors and borough presidents, battles with local community groups, and much more. After discovering a copy of the 1929 subway expansion map, author Joseph Raskin began his own investigation into the city’s underbelly. Using research from libraries, historical societies, and transit agencies throughout the New York metropolitan area, Raskin provides a fascinating history of the Big Apple’s unfinished business that until now has been only tantalizing stories retold by public-transit experts.

The Routes Not Taken sheds light on the tunnels and stations that were completed for lines that were never fulfilled: the efforts to expand the Hudson tubes into a fullfledged subway; the Flushing line, and why it never made it past Flushing; a platform underneath Brooklyn’s Nevins Street station that has remained unused for more than a century; and the 2nd Avenue line―long the symbol of dashed dreams―deferred countless times since the original plans were presented in 1929. Raskin also reveals the figures and personalities involved, including why Fiorello LaGuardia could not grasp the importance of subway lines and why Robert Moses found them to be old and boring. By focusing on the unbuilt lines, Raskin illustrates how the existing subway system is actually a Herculean feat of countless political compromises.

Filled with illustrations of the extravagant expansion plans, The Routes Not Taken provides an enduring contribution to the transportation history of New York City.



The Bowery: The Strange History of New York’s Oldest Street

00.00

(as of Dec 12,2018 00:58:54 UTC – Details)



From peglegged Peter Stuyvesant to CBGB’s, the story of the Bowery reflects the history of the city that grew up around it.

It was the street your mother warned you about—even if you lived in San Francisco. Long associated with skid row, saloons, freak shows, violence, and vice, the Bowery often showed the worst New York City had to offer. Yet there were times when it showed its best as well.

The Bowery is New York’s oldest street and Manhattan’s broadest boulevard. Like the city itself, it has continually reinvented itself over the centuries. Named for the Dutch farms, or bouweries, of the area, the path’s lurid character was established early when it became the site of New Amsterdam’s first murder. A natural spring near the Five Points neighborhood led to breweries and taverns that became home to the gangs of New York—the “Bowery B’hoys,” “Plug Uglies,” and “Dead Rabbits.” In the Gaslight Era, teenaged streetwalkers swallowed poison in McGurk’s Suicide Hall.

A brighter side to the street was reflected in places of amusement and culture over the years. A young P.T. Barnum got his start there, and Harry Houdini learned showmanship playing the music halls and dime museums. Poets, singers, hobos, gangsters, soldiers, travelers, preachers, storytellers, con-men, and reformers all gathered there. Its colorful cast of characters includes Peter Stuyvesant, Steve Brodie, Carry Nation, Stephen Foster, Stephen Crane, and even Abraham Lincoln.

The Bowery: The Strange History of New York’s Oldest Street traces the full story of this once notorious thoroughfare from its pre-colonial origins to the present day.




Folk City: New York and the American Folk Music Revival

$41.95 - $23.08

(as of Dec 04,2018 01:56:25 UTC – Details)



From Washington Square Park and the Gaslight Café to WNYC Radio and Folkways Records, New York City’s cultural, artistic, and commercial assets helped to shape a distinctively urban breeding ground for the folk music revival of the 1950s and 60s. Folk City explores New York’s central role in fueling the nationwide craze for folk music in postwar America. It involves the efforts of record company producers and executives, club owners, concert promoters, festival organizers, musicologists, agents and managers, editors and writers – and, of course, musicians and audiences.

In Folk City, authors Stephen Petrus and Ron Cohen capture the exuberance of the times and introduce readers to a host of characters who brought a new style to the biggest audience in the history of popular music. Among the savvy New York entrepreneurs committed to promoting folk music were Izzy Young of the Folklore Center, Mike Porco of Gerde’s Folk City, and John Hammond of Columbia Records. While these and other businessmen developed commercial networks for musicians, the performance venues provided the artists space to test their mettle. The authors portray Village coffee houses not simply as lively venues but as incubators of a burgeoning counterculture, where artists from diverse backgrounds honed their performance techniques and challenged social conventions. Accessible and engaging, fresh and provocative, rich in anecdotes and primary sources, Folk City is lavishly illustrated with images collected for the accompanying major exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York in 2015.