Italians of Philadelphia

$28.99 - $24.82

(as of Sep 12,2018 08:30:30 UTC – Details)



Philadelphia was second only to New York City in the number of Italian immigrants who settled in the city. Italians from the north have been in Philadelphia since Colonial times, but it was not until mass immigration from the south during the 1870s and 1880s that Italians began to make their mark on the city. Immigrating from small towns in the Italian regions of Abruzzo, Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Molise, Puglia, and Sicily, they faced discrimination, language barriers, the separation of family by thousands of miles, and work in unfamiliar trades. Facing such drastic changes in their lives head on, they persevered, establishing Italian neighborhoods and churches while weaving their customs into their new American lifestyles. Through the use of historic photographs, Italians of Philadelphia conveys the influence Italian immigrants had on the development of Philadelphia and how that spirit remains in the city today.



So You Think You’re a Philadelphia Eagles Fan?: Stars, Stats, Records, and Memories for True Diehards (So You Think You’re a Team Fan)

$14.99 - $10.19

(as of Sep 10,2018 22:27:32 UTC – Details)



So You Think You’re a Philadelphia Eagles Fan? tests and expands your knowledge of The Birds. Rather than merely posing questions and providing answers, you’ll get details behind each―stories that bring to life players and coaches, games and seasons.

This book is divided into four parts, with progressively more difficult questions in each new section. The Rookie section contains the most basic questions. Next come the Starter and All-Pro sections, followed by the biggest challenge: the Hall of Fame.

Also, you’ll learn more about the great Eagles players and coaches of the past and present, including Norm Van Brocklin, Steve Van Buren, Chuck Bednarik, Pete Retzlaff, Harold Carmichael, Dick Vermeil, Mike Quick, Randall Cunningham, Reggie White, Andy Reid, and Carson Wentz.. Some of the many questions that this book answers include:

  • Who scored the winning touchdown in the 1960 NFL Championship Game?

  • When Donovan McNabb became the starting quarterback during the 1999 season, who did he replace?

  • Who threw the longest touchdown pass in Eagles history?

  • Who are the only three Eagles players to lead the league in scoring?


  • This book makes the perfect gift for any fan of Philadelphia football!





    Rush: Revolution, Madness, and Benjamin Rush, the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father

    00.00

    (as of Sep 10,2018 05:29:09 UTC – Details)



    The remarkable story of Benjamin Rush, medical pioneer and one of our nation’s most provocative and unsung Founding Fathers
     
    In the summer of 1776, fifty-six men put their quills to a dangerous document they called the Declaration of Independence. Among them was a thirty-year-old doctor named Benjamin Rush. One of the youngest signatories, he was also, among stiff competition, one of the most visionary.
     
    A brilliant physician and writer, Rush was known as the “American Hippocrates” for pioneering national healthcare and revolutionizing treatment of mental illness and addiction. Yet medicine is only part of his legacy. Dr. Rush was both a progressive thorn in the side of the American political establishment—a vocal opponent of slavery, capital punishment, and prejudice by race, religion or gender—and close friends with its most prominent leaders. He was the protégé of Franklin, the editor of Common Sense, Washington’s surgeon general, and the broker of peace between Adams and Jefferson, yet his stubborn convictions more than once threatened his career and his place in the narrative of America’s founding.
     
    Drawing on a trove of previously unpublished letters and images, the voluminous correspondence between Rush and his better-known counterparts, and his candid and incisive personal writings, New York Times bestselling author and award-winning journalist Stephen Fried resurrects the most significant Founding Father we’ve never heard of and finally installs Dr. Rush in the pantheon of great American leaders.



    Philadelphia Railroads (Images of Rail)

    $21.99 - $19.07

    (as of Sep 08,2018 19:44:33 UTC – Details)



    Philadelphia became the railroad capital of the world in the 1830s when 12 distinct lines opened within a 100-mile radius of the city to carry people and freight. The railroad boom in the 19th century was made possible by the development of rural communities surrounding the city, the Industrial Revolution, excellent access to raw materials, and an influx of European immigrants. Philadelphia manufactured locomotives, railroad track, and other rail components and exported them around the world. The ability to move agricultural goods, manufactured products, and people commuting from home to work helped to unite the 27 boroughs, districts, and townships into one metropolis by 1854. Philadelphia Railroads features many unseen images and rare photographs documenting the leaders of Philadelphia’s transportation world.Used Book in Good Condition



    History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884 (Volume 2)

    00.00

    (as of Sep 08,2018 03:30:14 UTC – Details)



    HISTORY OF PHILADELPHIA.

    CHAPTER XXVIII.

    Manners and customs, 1700-1800

    Penn’s city-during the revolution – the America city

    What would have been William Peon’s amazement if, on his leaving Philadelphia, in 1701, he could have had a vision of the future ; if he had been told that three-quarters of the new century would barely have elapsed when the bells of that city would ring their joyful peals in honor of the birth of a nation, and “proclaim liberty throughout the land to all the inhabitants thereof;” if, peering still farther into that mysterious future, he had seen that nation, standing a giant amidst its elders, a living example of the blessings of freedom ? But Penn, however far-sighted, had no such vision. Neither can we, even in this wonderful progressive age, pierce the veil of futurity and read what changes another century shall bring. The past alone is ours, and if, looking into that past, we see, with the mind’s eye, the City of Brotherly Love as it was when its founder left it, never to return, and then turn to the Philadelphia of to-day, the contrast will be almost as great a matter of wonder to us as the vision would have been to Penn.

    And yet the origin of Philadelphia is not hidden in the mist of ages, like that of the ancient cities of the Old World ; it is not legendary, we need not accept uncertain facts from tradition, although more than two centuries have passed away since the first white man’s cabin was built on the shore of the Delaware, and our fathers were participators in the struggle for liberty to which we owe our being as a nation. We should be too familiar with our history to wonder at it. But the rapidity of the changes that occurred in the last century has done the work of ages. Old landmarks have been swept oft’, records destroyed, the chain of events broken, so to speak. So busy, so hurried is life in our day, that we scarcely note the changes that take place around us. It must be the historian’s task to colled the scattered material ere it is lost, to restore the missing links of facts ere they are disfigured by tradition, and by his pen-pictures nf the past to attach a new interest to objects and sites amidst which we live unmindful of the memories they awake.

    Philadelphia, at the beginning of the eighteenth

    century, was an object of curious interest to the stranger. Its green meadows, blooming gardens, and

    ! noble forest-trees endowed it with a sylvan beauty

    | which the lover of nature, the seeker of peaceful rest, must have found very attractive, while the practical observer could not but be struck with the bustling activity which already reigned about its wharves, its mills and shops, and the hopeful, contented air of its inhabitants.

    The first few years of the eighteenth century did not bring much change in the mode of life or the cos-

    I tume of the Philadelphians, but they brought much improvement in the general appearance of the city. Many new houses were built, of brick, and generally two or three stories high. Some of these houses had a balcony, usually a front porch,—a feature of vast importance in house-building, for it became customary for the ladies of the family in pleasant weather to sit on the porch, after the labor of the clay was over, and spend the evening in social converse. In those early days, and for a long time after, the young ladies of Philadelphia did not think it disgraceful to help in the housework; a few, having a large retinue of servants, and being gifted with artistic tastes, devoted …



    Bates’ Guide to Physical Examination and History-Taking – Eleventh Edition

    $125.99 - $199.99

    (as of Sep 07,2018 11:12:14 UTC – Details)


    The 11th edition of the pre-eminent textbook on physical examination contains foundational content to guide students’ approaches to history taking, interviewing, and other core assessment skills, as well as fully illustrated, step-by-step techniques that outline correct performance of physical examination. The book features a vibrant full-color art program and an easy-to-follow two-column format with step-by-step examination techniques on the left and abnormalities with differential diagnoses on the right. The comprehensive, evidence-based content is intended for medical students, high-level nursing education and practice markets, as well as related health professions such as physician assistants.

    New for this edition:
    –Content has been fully revised and updated to reflect the most recent health care literature.
    –More than 200 new and revised photographs and drawings have been added to better illustrate key points in the accompanying text.
    –Design and layout has been revised to increase discoverability of core material and special assessment tips.
    –Techniques of interviewing chapter has been reorganized to provide clearer insights into the skills of empathic listening.

    Used Book in Good Condition



    Philadelphia: A 300-Year History

    $114.29

    (as of Sep 06,2018 18:57:14 UTC – Details)



    A collection of scholarly essays commemorating Philadelphia’s 300th anniversary. Table of contents, acknowledgments, endnotes, index, biographical sketches of authors and contributors. Black and white illustrations throughout. xii, 842 pages. cloth, dust jacket, spine gilt-stamped, fore-edge uncut. 8vo..



    Italians of Philadelphia (PA) (Images of America)

    $21.99 - $18.69

    (as of Sep 06,2018 02:43:34 UTC – Details)



    Philadelphia was second only to New York City in the number of Italian immigrants who settled in the city. Italians from the north have been in Philadelphia since Colonial times, but it was not until mass immigration from the south during the 1870s and 1880s that Italians began to make their mark on the city. Immigrating from small towns in the Italian regions of Abruzzo, Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Molise, Puglia, and Sicily, they faced discrimination, language barriers, the separation of family by thousands of miles, and work in unfamiliar trades. Facing such drastic changes in their lives head on, they persevered, establishing Italian neighborhoods and churches while weaving their customs into their new American lifestyles. Through the use of historic photographs, Italians of Philadelphia conveys the influence Italian immigrants had on the development of Philadelphia and how that spirit remains in the city today.Used Book in Good Condition